Volume 17 Supplement 1

Abstracts of the 2015 SCMR/EuroCMR Joint Scientific Sessions

Open Access

Design of clinical cardioprotection trials using CMR: impact of myocardial salvage index and a narrow inclusion window on sample size

  • Henrik Engblom1,
  • Einar Heiberg1,
  • Svend Eggert Jensen2,
  • Jan Erik Nordrehaug3,
  • Jean-Luc Dubois-Randé4,
  • Sigrun Halvorsen5,
  • Sasha Koul6,
  • David Erlinge6,
  • Dan Atar5,
  • Marcus Carlsson1 and
  • Håkan Arheden1
Journal of Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance201517(Suppl 1):P90

https://doi.org/10.1186/1532-429X-17-S1-P90

Published: 3 February 2015

Background

Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) can be used to determine both myocardial infarct (MI) size and myocardium at risk (MaR), enabling assessment of myocardial salvage index (MSI). MI size as assessed by hyperenhancement on late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) has been shown to decrease approximately 25% during the first week after infarction. The aim of this study was to determine to what extent assessment of MSI and a narrow inclusion window affect the number of patients needed to reach sufficient statistical power in a clinical CMR cardioprotection trial.

Methods

Control subjects (n=91) from the recent CHILL-MI1 and MITOCARE2 cardioprotection trials, examined by CMR 2-6 days after acute reperfusion therapy, were used to assess the difference in sample size required to reach sufficient statistical power when using MI size alone compared to MSI as outcome variable. In addition, 22 patients undergoing CMR at day 1 and 7 after acute reperfused infarction from a previous follow-up study3 were included to assess to what extent sample size is affected by the decrease in hyperenhancement seen during the first week after infarction. The variability of MI size by LGE, MaR by contrast-enhanced SSFP and MSI was used to simulate 100.000 clinical trials for different assumed treatment effects to determine the number of patients needed to reach sufficient statistical power.

Results

For an assumed effect of 25 % reduction in MI size by a cardioprotection treatment, the number of patients needed to reach sufficient statistical power can be reduced by 48% (34 patients in each arm versus 65) if using MSI instead of MI size alone as outcome variable (Figure 1). If a fixed time point for the CMR examination is used instead of an inclusion window of 1-7 days after infarction, the number of patients needed to reach sufficient statistical power decreased by 31% for infarct size alone and 23% for MSI. Figure 2 shows an example of the reduction of hyperenhancement between day 1 and 7.
Figure 1

The number of patients needed in each arm to reach sufficient statistical power.

Figure 2

Change in hyperenhancement (arrows) day 1 and 7 after acute reperfusion therapy in a patient with inferior infarction.

Conclusions

There is a significant reduction in sample size needed to reach sufficient statistical power in CMR cardioprotection trials when using MSI instead of MI size alone as outcome variable. In addition, sample size can be further reduced by narrowing the inclusion window during the first week after the acute event.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Cardiac MR group Lund, Dept. of Clinical Physiology, Lund University
(2)
Department of Cardiology, Aalborg University Hospital
(3)
Department of Cardiology, Haukeland University Hospital
(4)
Department of Cardiology, Henri Mondor Hospital
(5)
Department of Cardiology B, Oslo University Hospital Ullevål, and Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo
(6)
Department of Cardiology, Lund University Hospital and Lund University

References

  1. Erlinge, et al: JACC. 2014, 63: 1857-65. 10.1016/j.jacc.2013.12.027.View ArticlePubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Atar, et al: EHJ. 2014, Epub aheadGoogle Scholar
  3. Engblom, et al: Circ CI. 2009, 2: 47-55.Google Scholar

Copyright

© Engblom et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Advertisement